Tuesday, November 14, 2017

5 Tips for Job Seekers Jumping In After a Long Employment Gap


Not everyone is meant to work 40, 50, or 60 straight years. Not everyone gets a job at twenty and very few people get through their entire career without taking a short break, voluntary or not. We retire early, go on an extended maternity leave, join the Peace Corps, or any number of other things between jobs. And, that’s totally fine.

Problems arise when you’re headed back into the job market after a gap in employment. Things have changed. The economy is different, industries have shifted, and the job search is more challenging and competitive than ever.

Jumping back into the job search can be an overwhelming, scary experience, but you can do something about it.

Check out these 5 tips for job seekers jumping in after a long employment gap:

Learn

Unless you work in medieval map restoration, your industry is constantly changing. Companies fall in and out of favor, profits fluctuate, and processes change all the time. Do some research and learn where your unique skills and experience fit best, and how they create a competitive advantage for you in the job hunt.

Websites like LinkedIn, GlassDoor, and company websites can help you gauge how things have changed since you last worked.

Assess

The job search requires a great deal of self-evaluation. As a worker, who are you? What do you have to offer prospective employers? Why do you want to work in this industry?

If it’s been a while since you worked, how has the industry changed? Figure out what skills make you a competitive applicant and which ones are irrelevant. Don’t be too hard on yourself, but honesty is key.

Re-build

If you haven’t been job seeking in more than a month or two, you’ll need to rebuild your job search tool kit. Look at your resume, your portfolio, personal website, and even your professional wardrobe.

Some things may stay the same, but you’ll find you might need to completely re-haul others.

Join the conversation

Not too long ago, the hiring process was rigid and regimented. Job seeker submits an application, hiring manager processes it, an interview happens, and a job pops out. Thanks to today’s technology, this process has loosened considerably. Job seekers can connect with their peers and important people in the industry to score job leads and advice.

If you haven’t already, join one or more social media site(s) (we suggest Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and/or the top discussion board forums for your profession). Make connections with people in your industry. Join a conversation and you could be talking to your next boss!

Start off slow

Just like running a marathon, sculpting a pot, or writing a novel, start things off slow and steady. If you’ve been out of work for a while, you don’t want to overwhelm yourself with everything at once. Make a list of all the things you need to do in your job search and consistently knock one or two off the list every day.

Once you get back in the swing of things, you’ll find that you don’t need a list anymore, and you won’t be burnt out either.

What do you think? What other steps should job seekers take after a long employment gap? Share your thoughts in the comments below!
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About the Author

Tony Morrison is the Vice President of Business Development at Cachinko, a unique professional community where social networking and job opportunities come together. His roles include sales, marketing, and business development. He is passionate about building B2B and B2C client relationships and brings this passion to Cachinko where he focuses on helping job seekers to find their ideal job and employers to find, attract, and engage their next rock star candidates.

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Tuesday, October 10, 2017

3 Interview Tips From Recruiters


If you are about to have an interview, then you need to prepare yourself ahead of time and know exactly what to do to show the best side of you to the interviewer. You could get some solid advice while working with technical recruiters, but it is also useful to do some research to find out what hiring managers really want.

Knowing what hiring managers want or at least determining what they want job seekers to know is not easy, which is why we have compiled three interview tips from recruiters themselves.

1. Come Prepared

One of the most important interview tips that interviewers can provide is to come prepared. If you’re already taking the time to do your research, then you’re on the right track. It’s important to impress a hiring manager by demonstrating your preparedness for the interview and for the job.

Of course, this doesn’t mean you have to construct a script beforehand and then present it to the interviewer; that would seem far too robotic. Rather, what you should be doing is researching interview tips, roleplaying common interview questions, and researching the company to which you are applying.

Memorize a couple of details about the company and figure out what the hiring manager wants from an employee based on the company’s needs and the job description. Doing your homework will show the interviewer you’re well-prepared and ready to take on the role of an employee for the company.

Demonstrating how prepared you are for the interview will also reveal a lot of positive aspects about your work ethic and your passion about getting the job.

2. Appearance Does Matter

There have been countless debates on how important appearance really is, but all hiring managers can agree on one thing: appearance does matter. Therefore, one of the most essential interview tips from recruiters is to appear clean, well-groomed, and sophisticated.

This doesn’t mean you have to wear your most expensive outfit, but it does mean you have to dress in a way that demonstrates your professionalism. You’re being interviewed for the potential to enter a professional environment so you must be able to show that you belong in such an environment. Even though you don’t want to be too fancy, you have to understand that it’s always better to be overdressed than to be underdressed.

Additionally, your body language during an interview is part of your appearance and the way you carry yourself. Therefore, you have to be mindful of how your body language makes you appear. Avoid bad posture or nervous tics as much as you can; instead, keep your back straight while maintaining steady eye contact with your interviewer.

3. Leave a Lasting Impression

Your ultimate goal during an interview is to leave a lasting impression upon the employer.

There are several ways to accomplish this: Showcase your skills and experience, emphasize your passion for the job, and, most importantly, let your personality shine. Interviews may seem like they are an opportunity for showing off your skills and talents, but they are also the crucial moment in which hiring managers decide whether or not you are a good fit for the company.

Hiring managers are constantly asking themselves whether you would blend into their company’s culture. Therefore, you must recognize the company’s vibe and emphasize your ability to be sociable and confident in such an environment. You want to leave the interviewer with a sense that you have made a strong first impression and that your personality is on par with your qualifications.
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Author: George Hoadley brings 11 years of experience in management to his role as the Branch Manager of Design Group Staffing in Vancouver. With a LinkedIn Recruiter Certification, his areas of expertise are construction management, engineering, project management, estimating, and operations.

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Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Body Lanuage in Job Interviews: What to be Aware of


You’re preparing for an interview (or maybe several). You’ve read up on the latest tips, and you’ve been rehearsing your answers to the most common interview questions. Maybe you’ve even done some research on the company you’re interviewing with, and you’ve come up with a few questions of your own.

In your research, though, did you think much about body language? It’s common for job seekers to focus on what they’re saying with words, but even seasoned candidates think less about what they’re saying with their bodies.

You can send many messages with your posture, your hands, and your face. What should you be aware of during your job interviews?

Your Hands and Arms

Some people complain about not knowing what to do with their hands during job interviews. Some people will hold pens; others will cross their arms or clasp their hands, simply because they don’t know what else to do.

At the other end of the spectrum, you have people who gesticulate wildly—their hands are everywhere as they illustrate every point they make with hand gestures.

It’s important to be aware of what you’re doing with your hands, because you don’t want to be caught at either extreme. Folding your arms could make you appear judgmental or nervous. And holding a pen might seem like a great idea—until you start playing with it.

Similarly, doing too much with your hands is a problem. While most experts agree some gesticulation is a good thing, too much may make you seem overdramatic. Pay attention to how much talking you do with your hands.

Your Posture

How do you usually sit in job interviews? Are you rigidly upright, or do you tend to slump or slouch in your chair? Do you cross your legs, or prop your ankle up over your knee? All of these different postures say something about you. The question is if they’re communicating what you want to say to your interviewers.

Most people recommend sitting up straight and well back in your chair. However, this might seem too formal for some; you might look uncomfortable or nervous. On the other hand, slouching could indicate you feel a little too comfortable—or that you’re bored or not interested in the job.

Try to find a natural sitting position in which you feel comfortable without slouching. A slight forward lean can communicate interest and confidence.

Your Face

You may not know exactly how expressive you are; relatively few people spend a lot of time talking to themselves in front of a mirror or a camera. But human beings are incredibly expressive—and most people express a lot through their faces. Some people are more expressive than others, but happiness, sadness, and anger all show plainly on your face.

Much like hand gestures, you want to use facial expressions moderately. Smiling, naturally and genuinely, says “I’m friendly” and helps your interviewers feel more at ease. A stony facial expression throughout the interview might say you’re cold and standoffish, but smiling too much can also be off-putting.

Practise in front of a mirror to see how you’re using facial expressions to accompany your words.

Your Feet

Do you cross your legs or ankles? Do you tap your toes or swing your foot to and fro in an interview? Sometimes, this kind of fidgeting is a result of nervousness—but it can also look like impatience or boredom. Do you really want your interviewer to think you’re tapping your foot because you want to get out of the interview as soon as you can?

Try to pay attention to what you do with your feet during an interview. While you may not think the interviewer will notice, it could be distracting—and more noticeable than you think.
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Author: Howard Gang. He is the Branch Manager of Design Group Staffing in Markham, Ontario. With over 30 years of electronics design and manufacturing experience, Howard has held a variety of progressive positions including product design engineering, program management, business development and executive level leadership roles where he influenced company strategy and direction.

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