Monday, February 22, 2010

Slash


The slash is also known as the diagonal and slant. Although, it appears frequently in informal writings, it has limited use in formal writing.

Use the slash as a stand-in for a word or words.

1. For the word to

price/ earnings ratio

2. For the word per

150 miles/hour

3. For the word or

and/or his/her

4. For the word and

the March/April issue

5. To shorten a popular expression

24/7 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week)

Sometimes, the slash indicates that the writer didn't take the time to think clearly and just jumbled together a couple of words for the reader to find out the actual meaning. If a slash represents confused writing, rewrite.

Poor: The actor contacted me to promote his movie and to dispel/ explain his tumultuous offscreen image.

Better: The actor contacted me to promote his movie and to dispel some of the myths behind his offscreen image.
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Thursday, October 22, 2009

Parentheses ( )


Parentheses ( ) are included into a sentence to enclose less important or explanatory information.

Use Parentheses in the following cases:

1. To set off explanatory or nonessential matter

"It is only in good writing that you will find how words are best used, what shades of meaning they can be made to carry, and by what devices (or lack of them) the reader is kept going smoothly or bogged down."

2. To provide or spell out an acronym

I want to create a LAN (Local Area Network) at office.

Punctuate sentences with parentheses as follows:

When the Parenthetical content is a complete statement, include punctuation within the parentheses.

(Don't expect me until midnight.)

When a Parenthetical matter falls in the middle or at the end of a sentence, place the necessary punctuation after the closing parenthesis.

If I arrive late (and it's quite likely), please let me in.

Do not put a comma, semicolon, or dash before an opening parenthesis.

Wrong: When I reach, (even if it's late), I'd appreciate a cup of coffee.

Right: When I reach (even if it's late), I'd appreciate a cup of coffee.

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Tuesday, August 04, 2009

How To Use Punctuation


Written by Rumki Sen

The most common mistake people tend to make while writing is in the use of Punctuation. Wrong punctuation can damage the flow of ideas and change meaning, but properly used punctuation not only helps readers understand your meaning but also makes them engrossed in your writing. The following discussion is about some of the frequently misused punctuation marks and what actually their correct application should be.

Use of Apostrophe - Use an apostrophe to show possession, but never put apostrophe in case of possessive pronouns...

Read the whole article on the following URL:
http://www.perfectediting.com/punctuation-rules.htm

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Wednesday, July 15, 2009

Use of Colon


The colon is a mark of anticipation, as the following rules illustrate.

Use a colon in the following cases:

1. To introduce a list, summary, long quotation, or final clause that explains or amplifies what precedes the colon

These men have one thing in common: They are all short.

2. Following the words as follows or the following

The recipe called for the following ingredients: unsweetened chocolate, evaporated milk, sugar, flour, salt, eggs, heavy cream, vanilla extract, and chopped nuts.

The concept of "as follows" may be implicit.

"In our country we have three unspeakably precious things: freedom of speech, freedom of conscience, and the prudence never to practice either."

3. In formal salutations

Dear Senator Goldwyn:

4. With ratios

5:2

5. To indicate dialogue

Rebecca: How are you?
Brian: Alive.

6. To separate a title and subtitle

Simple Essays: A Book of English Compositions

Note: Do not place a colon immediately after a verb

Wrong: Prerequisites for the course are: two years of philosophy, knowledge of history, and fluency in English.

Right: Prerequisites for the course are two years of philosophy, knowledge of history, and fluency in English.
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printed and distributed without the consent of the owner
of Perfect Editing Solutions. However, the URL
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