Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Top 5 Job Interview Blunders


1. A candidate took out a hair brush and brushed her hair in the middle of the interview.

2. A candidate answered her mobile phone and asked the interviewer to leave his own office because it was a "private" phone call.

3. A candidate kept ranting about the last company she worked for. Speaking negatively about your last job will give the interviewer the impression that you are a difficult person to get along with.

4. A candidate was overly modest during a job interview. Modesty won’t help you land a job. Confidently highlight your strengths and accomplishments.

5. A candidate arrived casually late for a job interview. Arriving late to a job interview won't help you in any way. Make sure to appear 10-15 minutes in advance and notify a receptionist that you have arrived.

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Wednesday, November 30, 2016

The Worst Resume Grammar Mistakes


1. Run-On Sentences

Split your run-on sentences up into coherent smaller sentences that make more sense.

2. Using Apostrophes in Plural Words

Plural words don't get apostrophes

3. Random Capitalization

"Resume" is not a name or title-it doesn't need to be capitalized.

4. Changing Tenses

Keep tenses consistent throughout the resume.

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Thursday, October 13, 2016

Bad Advice from Friends


This particular scenario happens way more often than you might think, so I’m sharing a recent experience in hopes of saving someone else.

One of my candidates was offered a job. The salary offered was over the top of the original salary range. By the way, this is a clear indication that the company really, really wants to hire you. It is extremely rare for an offer to come in at the top of the range, let alone more than the top of the range.

I found out after it was too late that the candidate took the advice of a “friend.” The friend advised my candidate to push for more money with specific instructions to avoid the recruiter and go directly to the hiring manager with the request/demand. The friend’s point was “What have you got to lose?”

And the answer to “what have you got to lose” is: The job offer. It was withdrawn.

This particular candidate had already exhausted his unemployment benefits and had told me he was desperate to find work. The salary that was offered was more than he had ever earned in any past job and he was convinced by his friend that even what was offered was lower than he could get if he just pushed for more money.

If you are working with a Professional Recruiter, you may want to consider this person actually knows what she is doing and will be able to advise and guide you in a way that your friend can’t.

After all, your friend truly does have nothing to lose when you lose the job offer.
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Author: Nancy Baughman President (nancybpres), Author at Calm Water Business Partner, LLC. She has over twenty years of general management experience in human resources, operations, marketing and finance, predominantly with start-ups and small to mid-size companies.

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